Health for good

WHAT YOUR TONGUE REVEALS ABOUT YOUR HEALTH

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Take a moment to examine your tongue in the mirror; it might seem peculiar, but your tongue can serve as a valuable indicator of your overall health. A black and hairy appearance may signal inadequate oral hygiene or even diabetes. A bright red tongue could suggest a deficiency in folic acid, vitamin B12, or iron, or it may be indicative of strep throat or fever.

A tongue adorned with red and white spots may indicate worn-down taste buds, often a consequence of consuming excessively sour or hot foods. Fortunately, taste buds naturally regenerate, alleviating this common occurrence.

The next time you inspect your tongue after your morning routine, here are additional insights into what you might discover about your health:

WHITE PATCHES ON YOUR TONGUE
White patches may indicate oral candidiasis, an overgrowth of yeast or thrush. A week of regular tongue brushing can help determine if it’s an oral hygiene issue. If the patches persist, an overgrowth of candida may be the cause, treatable with anti-fungal drugs.

BLACK AND HAIRY-LOOKING TONGUE
Several factors, such as yeast infections, diabetes, cancer therapies, and poor oral hygiene, can cause a black, hairy appearance. This is often due to a buildup of dead skin cells on the tongue’s papillae. Practicing excellent oral hygiene, including regular tongue brushing, usually resolves this condition without the need for medical intervention.

RED AND WHITE SPOTS ON YOUR TONGUE
Red and white spots on the tongue are typically benign, indicating areas where taste buds have worn down. This common occurrence requires no specific treatment.

ABNORMAL REDNESS OF THE TONGUE
A red tongue may suggest a deficiency in folic acid, B12, or iron, or it could be a sign of fever or strep throat. Rather than a standalone ailment, a red tongue reflects overall health and is usually addressable with supplements or medication.

WEBBED OR STRIPPED APPEARANCE
A webbed or striped appearance may result from oral lichen planus, an inflammatory condition where the immune system attacks cells. While not contagious, it increases the risk of mouth cancer. Proper dental hygiene, avoidance of tobacco, and monitoring the condition are key to managing this condition.

RIDGES ON YOUR TONGUE
Ridges, caused by teeth pressing into the tongue, often occur during sleep. Fortunately, these ridges require no specific treatment and naturally fade over time.

BUMPS ON YOUR TONGUE
Bumps on the tongue are commonly canker sores or cold sores, attributed to factors like biting, smoking, or stress ulcers. Home remedies such as gargling warm salt water and maintaining good oral hygiene are recommended. If necessary, consult your dentist to discuss the condition.

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